Traditional Aboriginal Myth

Which Was Printed In Web Of Wyrd #10

Anon


Back in the Dreamtime, Gidja the Moon lived by the river with the Bullanji people. They made fun of him, because he was round and fat, with little stringy legs and arms. Gidja loved Yalma, the Evening Star, but she laughed at him too. So Gidja made a magic circle of stones, and at dusk every night, sat in his circle and sang of his love for Yalma. He made so many songs! So, Yalma agreed to marry him and the Bullanji people held corroboree for them. Now Yalma had a baby daughter - Lilga, the Morning Star. Lilga would go hunting with her father, Gidja. One day, while gathering honey, a limb fell off a tree and crushed Lilga, so she died. This was the first time that anyone had ever died. Poor Gidja mourned his daughter, but the Bullanji people were afraid, and blamed Gidja for bringing death to the world. When Gidja carried his little Morning Star in her coffin over the river, some men cut the ropes holding the bridge, and he fell into the river. The coffin drifted out to sea, and today, you can still see little Morning Star shining out at sea. Gidja climed out of the river, and made a fire. He carried a bright burning brand from the fire, and walked through the forest. The people saw him and were afraid. The they saw it was Gidja, and were angry. They tried to kill him, but couldn't, so they picked him up and threw him up into the sky. As he rose up, he cursed the people, and said they would all die, and remain dead. But he, and the grass, would die, and would come back to new life. And so it is. Gidja grows fatter and fatter, and then fades away like a little old man. Lilga though, shines brightly. Just like he said, Gidja comes back to life. At dusk on the third day after he dies, you can see him again, floating like a baby's cradle, waiting to start again.

Quote of the moment:
"I *could* be arguing in my spare time." - Monty Python

This site has received 12253825 hits since Aug 4, 2000

COPYLEFT:
The entire content of all public pages in The Pagan Library (graphics, text and HTML) are free information, released under the terms of the GPL. All copyrighted items mentioned are the property of their respective owners, and no form of ownership or endorsement is implied.

Last modified: June 12 2016 13:25:00