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Posted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 6:56 am
by MettaPax
Willow wrote:He was more likely a Hindu than a Sikh, I have met a person who claimed they could levitate.

Hinduism can be different sometimes. A guru at a world religons conference told me this story.

There was a guru approached by a family of Hindu's. They said to the Guru "our son has died before his time, the astrologers said he would die five years from now, can you fix this."

The guru walked into the nearest morgue (read, pile of thousands of bodies in a cold room) and picked a body and brought it back to life. The family said "Thank you guru but this is not our son." Unphased, the guru picked another body and raised it back to life." Again the family was impressed but that was not their son. On his third try the guru picked the right man and brought him back to life much to the elation of the family.

A visintg reporter from America saw the whole incident and was amazed "Its a miracle" he cried "I never believed anyone would ever actually be raised from the dead."

One of the guru's devotees looked at the reporter and said "Well yes, raising people from the dead is impressive, but the real miracle is that he actually found the body after only three tries"

Don't worry if you don't get it, the guru who told me this almost died laughing, I had to study India for a while before the joke really became funny.
I get it! :lol: It's cause the guru kept "reincarnating" the soul into a different body, yes? I think it is a very funny story. :-D

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:21 am
by Willow
Nope...actually it is just a commentary on how crazy Indian society is.

I found the story again in a book called Karma Cola, it is a good but weird read.

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 7:49 am
by MettaPax
Willow wrote:Nope...actually it is just a commentary on how crazy Indian society is.

I found the story again in a book called Karma Cola, it is a good but weird read.
:oops: oops... #-o my bad.... :-? oh well. :-D I still like the story! :-D

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:05 am
by Willow
no worries,

maybe it can be interpretted in 100 ways, that would jive with Indian culture too.

I shouldn't have been so quick to correct, you can like it for whatever reason you like it for :-? Did that make any sense?

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:32 am
by MettaPax
Willow wrote:no worries,

maybe it can be interpretted in 100 ways, that would jive with Indian culture too.

I shouldn't have been so quick to correct, you can like it for whatever reason you like it for :-? Did that make any sense?
Yes, makes total sense to me. :-D I once got into a "heated discussion" with my high school english teacher about the interpretation of a story, I believe it was "A Seperate Peace"... I view stories as an art form so I feel they are open to interpretation like a piece of artwork, he flet quite differently and was upset that I didn't agree with his ZPOV. :lol: Silly really.

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 9:15 pm
by Crazy Healer Lady
That always bothered me as well. Thankfully, my grade 11 & 12 English and English Lit teahers were just as passionate about novels and plays as I was. Ah, but in college, my favourite English teacher was amazing!! We would spend HOURS interpreting the tiniest details! It was marvellous. A complete waste of time to the outside world, but, gods, what a life. If I could get paid to do that, I would be very happy.

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 10:05 pm
by Ragnar
My favourite was my customs and mythology proffessor at Edinburgh uni, who´s first words were "You get people that call themselves "witches, even claim to be hereditary, but no such thing as witchcraft has ever existed, they are just fools and liars".

Had some FUN times on her lectures, regarding "interpretations". :lol:

Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:46 am
by MettaPax
Crazy Healer Lady wrote:That always bothered me as well. Thankfully, my grade 11 & 12 English and English Lit teahers were just as passionate about novels and plays as I was. Ah, but in college, my favourite English teacher was amazing!! We would spend HOURS interpreting the tiniest details! It was marvellous. A complete waste of time to the outside world, but, gods, what a life. If I could get paid to do that, I would be very happy.
Ahhhh.... but my dear! You can get paid to do that! Well, sort of. I have a friend that reads screen plays for HBO and Miramax for a living. She reads them and then gives them her honest opinion about the story, kind cool!

Posted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 6:32 pm
by Crazy Healer Lady
:-D Sweeeeeet

Nice to know there are options!! I didn't know that!

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:07 am
by Willow
Sometimes detail interpretting is fun. I think we will always need people to think critically about the details.

Interpretation is a funny thing. There was a show on the CBC this week about womena nd men authors, people were read pieces of literature and asked to guess if it was a man or a woman writing and if it was a man or a woman's point of view. I twas really interesteing, they people guessing were right 100% of the time, but then the host talked about how they had tried tomake computer prgrams that would mimic male or female speech and people could only figure out if the computer was male or female 50 % of the time.

Moral of the story, you can't standardize interpretation.

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 8:53 am
by Kitsune
My english teachers hated me for that.

Point: We were studing the poem about Ozymandias, written by the 1800's british gent... My teacher asked our opinions and everyone in the class commented that he must have been a horrible ruler, because he allowed slavery to continue, and there was no democracy :roll: ...

I argued that he was probally a very good Pharoh for those very reasons, and that it was unfair of us to judge him based only on this man's work.

They said Slavery was wrong, and I said "Not by the Egyptians standards!"

My teacher shut me up after that, and actually searched me out at lunch that day, to tell me that although I was completely correct, the school was not allowed to endore any view that even hinted that Slavery was not evil, and therefore, in class at least, my viewpoint was invalid. #-o

So, I understand completely the love of arguing veiwpoint. People tend to get very frustrated, because I'll vemenetly argue an unpopular viewpoint, and then then realize that I don't actually think that the viewpoint is correct. I'm just trying to make them see that they shouldn't be so close-minded... And that's what frustrates them!

Posted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 5:03 am
by Willow
I have had that same problem....

We were talking about homosexuality in the Bible. I said you have to contextualise statements as right and wrong changes over time. I was told that no good Christian contextualises the Bible as right and wrong never changes.

I asked, if that was so, how come Paul never said anything about Pedophilia? Their argument, real Christians just knew it was wrong, Paul lived in a time when Roman and Greek citizens often took on youn g sexual aprrentices of the same sex.

I think pedophilia is horrible, but if right and wrong never changes, how come Paul didn't forbid it? there is evidence that members of the early church continued these relationships.

So Kitsune, I know what you mean. Needless to say, that group thought I was some sort of sicko after that.