"Wicca and Unitarianism Not religions" says Texas

Now here's something to get steamed up about.
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runewulf
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Post by runewulf » Wed Aug 17, 2005 9:31 pm

Well.... if you wish to be technical....

The franks were a germanic tribe... the vikings came from germanic tribes as well (nordic)... the modern french are a mix of celtic and germanic blood... both which originated from the indoeuropean peoples...

And Ragnar is right, even though you see a lot of so called vikings with the horned helmets, almost all of such items found were from the franks and not the actual "vikings", which is also a misnomer, as vikings weren't truly people, per se, but a an action/trade... lol, viking was a verb, not a noun, vikings were people who went viking, aka, traveled and traded, raided, fought, etc.

kk, enough of that, migraine meds don't make for overly lucid expounding on esoteric socio-anthropolical fine points.

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Ragnar
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Post by Ragnar » Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:13 pm

Battle axes yes. I LOVE battle axes. War hammers came later, 12>13 Century. Thats not to say that hammers were not used in battle. At least not hammers made as "battle hammers". Even in WWII British farmers were taught how to use pitch forks like spears. In Viking/middle ages any thing that came to hand was used as a weapon. Also you may be dissapointed to know, only 4>5% of Vikings carriesd swords, and only 1>2% had helmets, the same for chain mail. And spears were NEVER thrown. Much to expensive to give to the enemy to throw back. A sword and helmet would have cost the equivelant of $40,000, in todays money.
Only the same percentage of the Scandinavian population went to sea as today, so if you think how many seamen you know, then thats the same then.

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dragonflydrummer
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Post by dragonflydrummer » Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:46 am

Ragnar writes:
War hammers came later, 12>13 Century. Thats not to say that hammers were not used in battle. At least not hammers made as "battle hammers".
That's interesting. So even Thorr's Mjolinar wasn't actually a war-hammer -- but one of a black-smith's type? Geez -- the comic-books sure have put a gloss on that period. Things were pretty basic, eh? Not a lot of things around to have, and those that were around were expensive. I could see why you'd want to go viking just to get something. And then of course there was Lindisfarne mead...

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Ragnar
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Post by Ragnar » Thu Aug 18, 2005 8:14 am

Aye, you're correct, Thorrs hammer was more of a Smiths hammer. I do not know if you have ever seen a real smith working, not a lot of them left. But when the hammer hits the hot metal, in a dark smithy, then you can see the link between the thunder and Thorr. The whole work-shop fills with light from the sparks. It's brilliant on a dark, foggy, cold November evening to sit in the smithy with a bottle of good Scotch, the lit forge, and all. GREAT.
Thorr is also heavily linked with Hengest and Horsa (allthough then he would be known as "Donnar", as they were Saxon). Also with "Wealand Smith". See also ...Oh damn, I've forgotten the saga name. But its one of the most famous "Smiths" (obviously) in the Viking sagas. Made drinking cups out of the skulls of the Princes, and B******d off with Brunhild.
Plus, built as a "war hammer" or not I would not care to ask the bearer to sit down and discuss the authenticity of medeavil weaponary.

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Kystar
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Post by Kystar » Thu Aug 18, 2005 1:14 pm

I work Ren faires on occassion as a preformer, and I've been around a smith in the early morning when he was getting started. Granted, he had a tent instead of a full smithy, but I remember the sparks lighting up the morning mist so nicely!
You say "Witch" like it's a bad thing!

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Post by Arcanum Owl » Mon Aug 22, 2005 2:22 pm

About the whole tax-free status for religious organisations.

When it comes to tax (son of an accountant) I can tell you right now that any big organisation that has a sizable cash inflow will always be able to get out of tax, that's what accountants are for. In most cases if one has the capital to back it up you can in a sense backlog your tax to pay when hell freezes over, or my mother's own term, infinity.

I.E. Like a loan with the due date being jalong.

Even though a religious organisation is tax-free via the government, it will eventually re-attain this status after removing it. After all a Church is alot like a bank, an there followers are simply loan holders/repaying who didn't get lawyer to look over the contract.

#-o But then again it might just be the principal of the thing.
Though I hate when someone uses that line, "But it's the principal of the thing."
Typical response, "(sigh) Man, I hate you!"

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"Project what you are and what you feel, not what you think!" - quoted from yours trully.

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