What the beejeezum is a nidding pole?

Discussions of all things pagan and neo-pagan.
User avatar
runewulf
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 820
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2003 8:38 pm
Location: USA
Zodiac: Scorpio
Contact:

Post by runewulf » Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:53 am

yes, this most likely comes from the old norse root that linked in to the niding pole.
http://cajungypsy.blogspot.com

User avatar
Ragnar
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2820
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Preußen (Deutschland).
Contact:

Post by Ragnar » Wed Oct 25, 2006 6:51 am

Niddhing comes from the same root as Niddhog, the dragon that chews the roots of the world tree.

It means gnawing.

Which, if you consider the use of a Niddhing pole, is pretty apt. As it does not act swiftly, like a lightning bolt, but gnaws at peoples conscience.

User avatar
forgotten oceans
Level 17
Level 17
Posts: 489
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 4:08 am
Location: J'ville, Tx
Contact:

Post by forgotten oceans » Wed Oct 25, 2006 8:39 am

So, does the horse have to die violently, or can it be the fresh dead farm pet horse? Or does that depend on if you're cursing or protecting? Like good ol Boxer guarding the place and the ritualy beat and killed horse for child molesting neighbor? Another thing, from what I gather, german heatherns tend to use dead horses alot, any reason?
Maybe now you're starting to understand that while I may have been born predispositioned to be pretty batty, my parents saw to it that it was a certainty and completely unavoidable. -Me

User avatar
Ragnar
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2820
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Preußen (Deutschland).
Contact:

Post by Ragnar » Wed Oct 25, 2006 9:09 am

forgotten oceans wrote:So, does the horse have to die violently, or can it be the fresh dead farm pet horse?
Well, as I think I said earlier, it CAN be a carved wooden head. But for serious Niddhings, then a horse specialy sacrificed for the purpose would be more appropriate than finding an old horse head in the street. :-D
Or does that depend on if you're cursing or protecting?
Not really any difference there, besides intent of the end result. Other than that the same rules apply.
Another thing, from what I gather, german heatherns tend to use dead horses alot, any reason?
Well, to be a sacrifice "worthy of the Gods" it must be something of great value to the people performing the sacrifice, and, therefore, considered to be of the same value to the Gods called upon.

Except maybe for a ship, there was nothing more valuble in the Germanic world than a good breeding horse.

Therefore the popularity of sacrificing them.

Remember, they did not have many "working" animals. Maybe dogs, but other than that it was Oxen, slaves or horses.

User avatar
forgotten oceans
Level 17
Level 17
Posts: 489
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2005 4:08 am
Location: J'ville, Tx
Contact:

Post by forgotten oceans » Wed Oct 25, 2006 10:15 am

Ohhh, like law of equivilent exchange. To gain something of value, something of equal value must be given in exchange. I didn't know that horses were the big thing over there, here we have cows and goats, and a lot more variety on what to kill, like little stuff would call for a chicken but bigger stuff cows, mules, maybe the neighbors brats. I've never heard of native americans killing horses ritually for any thing, I wonder if they did? Thanks Ragnar, learn something new every day. :-D
Maybe now you're starting to understand that while I may have been born predispositioned to be pretty batty, my parents saw to it that it was a certainty and completely unavoidable. -Me

User avatar
Ragnar
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2820
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Preußen (Deutschland).
Contact:

Post by Ragnar » Thu Oct 26, 2006 1:24 am

forgotten oceans wrote: I've never heard of native americans killing horses ritually for any thing, I wonder if they did?
I think I am correct in saying that the native Americans did not have horses until the Spanish took them over.

They are not, as far as I know, natural to the Americas.

User avatar
SageWolf
Level 24
Level 24
Posts: 716
Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 8:20 pm
Location: Missouri
Contact:

Post by SageWolf » Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:01 am

Some Native American Cultures killed horses at furnral ceramonies, When a warrior died their best horse was killed to go with him in the after life. It was the Warriors best horse and it was considered an honor.
I'll look for my info I read it along long time ago but I remember alot.

An no Horses are not native to America they were brought with the Spaniards, but that didn't stop the Native Americans from adopting horses as their own. :-D

SageWolf
To Error is Human, To really foul things up Requires a Computer.

unknown as far as I know

User avatar
Ragnar
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2820
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 12:26 pm
Location: Preußen (Deutschland).
Contact:

Post by Ragnar » Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:26 am

SageWolf wrote:that didn't stop the Native Americans from adopting horses as their own.
Indeed, and very well too. 8-)

User avatar
Sìle
Level 3
Level 3
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2009 1:00 pm
Location: British Isles
Contact:

Re:

Post by Sìle » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:05 pm

Grumpy wrote:Ohhhh. Very cool. Do people do still use these? Are they big 'ole things like Native Totem poles or more like a staff?
I know someone who recently made one and put it out on the borders of his property. It was bigger than a staff and very had not to see. :lol:
Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests